Wind and Water: Creating in Blues

I’ve been working in a lot of blues lately, and I’m so happy with how this piece came out. I paired this lettering that I created for a client with a portrait from a my sketchbook. Using deep indigo hues to offset the lighter, delicate florals made me think of wind and water.

Here is the finished piece:

 African Woman in Head Wrap - Portrait in pencil by Laura Dreyer

 Closeup detail.

Closeup detail.


 Closeup detail.

Closeup detail.


Here are a few more blue pieces from my portfolio:

Interview with Alejandra Linares


I got connected with Alejandra Linares when I spent time in Miami this year. Her tenacity and perseverance is inspiring. I love to see artists who are caring for their gifts and the creativity that gives them joy! Her linework is energetic and her recent color explorations on her instagram are beautiful and mysterious. Here is my interview with Alejandra!

Interview with Alejandra Linares, Graphic Designer, Illustrator, and Painter:

What do you do or make?

Alejandra Linares (AL): I do a variety of things, I’m a graphic designer, a painter and an illustrator.

How do you define success for yourself?

AL: When you can wake up every day and do what you love. As I grow older I realize that doing so it’s not something that happens to everybody, so I’m really grateful I can do this for a living.

 Artwork by Alejandra Linares. 

Artwork by Alejandra Linares. 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are?

AL: Definitely, organized chaos. I purposely create some chaos in my artwork to challenge myself to see another way to approach my art and “re-organize” it. I feel if everything is too perfect and there are no room for mistakes, then there won’t be any room for learning something new. 

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?

AL:

  1. Growing up in Venezuela. In my country I’ve met the most amazing artist that inspire me to be better every day.
  2. My mom - she is an art teacher and was the first to teach me about art and her perception on it.
  3. Music - My whole life I’ve been surrounded by people that either love music or they are musicians themselves. Before I paint or start working on a project in my computer I always find a song that inspires me (and if I’m honest I play it on repeat until I’m done).
 Artwork by Alejandra Linares. 

Artwork by Alejandra Linares. 

How do you keep joy in what you do?

AL: Simply by changing things around. I change my style of designing/painting quite often. When I’m doing digital projects (like my freshii illustrations or my don limon illustration) I tend to have a different approach from what I do when I’m painting on canvas. I guess is because each medium makes you feel different and therefore what you create is different.

  Imaginary Lines III.  Original hand drawing on Canson Watercolor Paper by Alejandra Linares. 16 in. x 20 in.

Imaginary Lines III. Original hand drawing on Canson Watercolor Paper by Alejandra Linares. 16 in. x 20 in.

What is some of the best advice you received?

AL: To be successful, you must never give up.

 

Find out more about Alejandra on her sites:

Alejandra's portfolio and shop at alejandralinares.com

Alejandra on Instagram and Twitter


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews!  - Laura

Feathers or Ink: The Letter B

I love making letters! Back in college, my painting professor, Aaron Gosser told us that when you set out to make abstract work, it helps a lot to have something to base the beginning on. I like letterforms for this reason—they are a great little frame to build abstract forms around!

Feathers: Here's one of my Drop Cap drawings for the letter B: I loved the feeling of the smaller curled hatching on the feathers mirroring the larger curls of the B shape.

letterB.jpg

Ink: I took this freehand drawing I made in ink, and colored it with a watercolor piece to create this stained letter B. I loved feeling surprised at the different aesthetic created just by changing the outlines to solid shapes!

 Freehand drawing of the letter B. I am really inspired by Art Nouveau and Alphonse Mucha! The way his organic forms play between and flow into geometric shapes is so enchanting—and really addicting to draw.

Freehand drawing of the letter B. I am really inspired by Art Nouveau and Alphonse Mucha! The way his organic forms play between and flow into geometric shapes is so enchanting—and really addicting to draw.

 Making using the solid shapes, I added watercolor. I am really into this color combination, I realized it's the same one as my  Dreaming in Flowers  piece!

Making using the solid shapes, I added watercolor. I am really into this color combination, I realized it's the same one as my Dreaming in Flowers piece!

Balancing Creativity and Business: Interview with Miss Mustard Seed, Writer, Designer, and Stylist.

  

Miss Mustard Seed, aka Marian Parsons, held a special place in life during my teenage years. We painted murals together, baked desserts, volunteered with middle schoolers (all to the soundtrack of musicals on the cd player!) - she was my mentor and friend who welcomed me into her life and creativity. A lot of what I do today with mentoring middle school girls is inspired by her! Although we moved to different parts of the country years ago, I have loved following the flourishing creative business she has built with Miss Mustard Seed. Enjoy reading about her perspective on entrepreneurial creativity below!

Miss Mustard Seed, aka Marian Parsons:

What do you do or make?

Marian Parsons, (Miss Mustard Seed, MMS): I do a lot of things! I am a blogger, designer (products, textiles, and a paint line), artist, and freelance writer, stylist, & photographer.

 Miss Mustard Seed started out creating pieces of hand-painted furniture.

Miss Mustard Seed started out creating pieces of hand-painted furniture.

How do you define success for yourself?

MMS: In a business sense, I do look at profitability as well as how creatively fulfilling an endeavor is, but I also think simply trying something can be a success. Even if it doesn’t work out, you can learn and grow from the experience. I think my failures have built into me just as much as my successes. 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are? 

MMS: I am a free spirit and a nerd. I don’t like being boxed in and I want lots of freedom to be creative, but I also want to have my books in order and I love a good profit and loss report!  I think it’s those two sides that have helped me be successful. It’s not all about creativity and it’s not all about business. It’s a balance of both. 

 Marian's current studio.

Marian's current studio.

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?
MMS:

  1. Definitely growing up in Germany. I’m attracted to just about all things from that region – décor, food, color palettes, architecture, etc. 

  2. My Oma was very sentimental about things and loved collecting. I think she gave me an appreciation for family heirlooms. 

  3. Music was a big part of my family. Everyone played multiple instruments and we sat around and sang often. We also listened to music a lot. So, music is an integral part of my days. I listen to it when I’m cleaning, painting, exercising. It’s a good motivator and it helps me focus. 

How do you keep joy in what you do?

MMS: I do a lot of different things, so I don’t get burned out on one thing. If I painted furniture every day, it would get very tiresome. So, I mix it up and try to chase what is feeding my inspiration on that particular day. Sometimes I have to pin myself down and do the work whether I want to or not, but I know I can shift gears once that project is done. 

 In 2017, Marian started a series of oils paintings.

In 2017, Marian started a series of oils paintings.

What is some of the best advice you received? 

MMS: Early in my business, I had a very business-savvy mentor who told me I didn’t need to apologize or feel bad for making money. It was a simple piece of advice, but what I needed to start thinking like an entrepreneur. I was having a hard time putting ads on my blog and charging a worthwhile amount for my services. Would monetizing my blog or raising my rates mean that I was selling out? The fact was, this was a business and it needed to be profitable for me. She really helped shape me into the entrepreneur I am today.    

Marian's (aka Miss Mustard Seed) Websites/ Social Media:

Marian's Miss Mustard Seed Website

Marian on Instagram and Twitter

Marian's Miss Mustard Seed's Shop for books, chalk paint, and products


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews!  - Laura

Peter Pan Book Cover Drawing Process!

Here's a little look at the process of creating my Peter Pan book cover illustration!

1. Drawing process:

 Video of the Drawing Process of My Peter Pan Book Cover!

Video of the Drawing Process of My Peter Pan Book Cover!

3. Trying Out Different Colors:

 Two color options for Peter Pan.

The Brown option looked a little too sandy or dry, so I liked the blue one better - it felt a little more smooth and moonlight!

4. Final Piece!

Prints for Sale Here:

 Peter Pan Book Cover Illustration

Peter Pan Book Cover Illustration

"Sharing the Joy that I Know:" Interview with Nick George, Writer and Poet.


Nick-george-interview

Nick George has the talent for gathering people, speaking honestly while creating safe spaces to share thoughts, feelings, questions, dreams, and art. I have loved attending the Listening spoken word events. His blend of humor and care for his city is impossible to ignore, and I'm super excited to share a little bit about him here today! 

Nick George, Writer, Poet, and Founder of The Listening, Inc.

What do you do/make?

Nick George (NG): I am a writer and poet. I make simple things complicated. Sometimes in reverse. Sometimes they rhyme.


Ted Talk by Nick George, founder of The Listening, Inc., a space where the essential question is "If you had a room full of people willing to listen to you, what would you say?"

How do you define success for yourself?

NG: The definition of success varies, because the use and function of what I write is different from moment to moment. Sometimes I write for myself, and that is success all on its own. It's not always easy to access the catharsis of creation. Other times, I may write to illuminate a truth in hopes that someone else might be impacted by it. If it lands on an open heart, and it leads them to seeing things differently, I count that as success.

 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are? 

NG: As of late, I've been burdened by the realization of my identity and adulthood. No doubt about it, I'm still very much the same person I was ten years ago, but I've also changed in very certain ways. I've grown, but I'm still the same. I've matured, but I'm also very young-minded. It's a strange contradiction, because I do feel like the summation of my experiences, but each day feels like a revelation of sorts; I feel myself becoming something completely different that is at the same time truer to who I've always been. I'm not even sure if that sentence makes sense!

Spoken word by Nick George. Video by mwendo

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today? 
NG:

  1. Michael Jackson - I don't think it's possible to overstate the impact of seeing a passion and talent like Michael Jackson. It is one of the things that informs my writing and performances, because while he is recognized as one of the greatest entertainers of all time, it seems like he is giving more and more of himself. I strive to have my own passion inform how I present my poetry when I perform, because I believe that allows it to transcend make the experience mutually beneficial.
     
  2. Huck Finn - Huckleberry Finn, by way of Mark Twain, is a character noted by his mischievous nature and curious maturity. I've just been fascinated in his account of the world around him, and his daring to learn his place in it and ask more questions. I wish I could say I was as scrappy, but maybe in my imagination, I am!
     
  3. Maya Angelou - Of course, as a poet, Maya Angelou has always been a major influence. I account her as my gateway drug, because she was the first poet I remember that made me feel like poetry was a language I could understand. I find the utility and function of words as a communication device astounding and humbling. These words can halt armies and create avenues of understanding. It's a beautiful thing to consider the ways we can use figurative language to make more.

Spoken word by Nick George: A cover of Jimmy Needham's "The Reason I Sing" Featuring Luke & Semone. Produced and recorded by Luke Seavers for One Nine Productions.

How do you keep joy in what you do? 

NG: I don't know that my writing serves the purposes of necessarily "keeping" joy, but more of re-experiencing and sharing the joy that I know. My worldview is that of believing in each person's access to what they were born with - what a joy it is to be a part of them recognizing their inborn value and beauty! If my words allow someone to see the world around them differently, I find that honorable and, to be honest, kinda dope!

 

 

What is some of the best advice you received? 

NG: from poet Adam Gottlieb - "Poet, breathe now. Because it's the last thing you'll ever do for yourself."

 

Nick George's Websites and Social Media:

Nick George's Website

Nick's Instagram

The Listening Inc. Website

The Listening, Inc. on Instagram


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews!

- Laura

"Being Around Good People:" Interview with Amos Ang, Keyboardist, Pianist and Music Producer.


Dimensional-Creatives-Amos-Ang.jpeg

Amos Ang is a friend from my NYC days. His makes people seen and heard, not only in his professional collaborations with other musicians, but also to the simple way he treats people on a day-to-day basis. I highly recommend you check out his music on Soundcloud!

Amos Ang, Keyboardist, Pianist and Music Producer.

 Amos Ang, Keyboardist.

Amos Ang, Keyboardist.

What do you do or make?
Amos Ang: Keyboardist/Pianist and Music Producer.

How do you define success for yourself?
AA: Doing my best at whatever opportunity that comes my way.

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are?
AA: Perfectionist / Chillax. They make me contradictory at times... lol
 

 Amos Ang on 987FM with Tabitha Nauser

Amos Ang on 987FM with Tabitha Nauser

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?
AA:

  1. Music
  2. Sports (team sports)
  3. Friendship

How do you keep joy in what you do?
AA: Constantly surround yourself things that you enjoy. For me it's good art and being around people (mostly an extroverted person).

What is some of the best advice you received?
AA: To be honest.

 

Amos Ang's Websites/ Social Media:

Listen to Amos Ang's music on Soundcloud

Amos Ang on Instagram


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews!

- Laura

"Handcrafting Details:" Interview with Danikqwa Rambert, Embroiderer & Graphic Designer


 Interview with Danikqwa Rambert,  Embroiderer and Graphic Designer

Danikqwa and I met years ago in college where we were both studying design, and today she is living in Rhode Island, creating amazing embroidery pieces and working as a graphic designer. I love seeing her creating work that comes from her heart and the way it celebrates beauty. Read more in my interview below!

Danikqwa Rambert, Embroiderer & Graphic Designer.

What you do or make?

Danikqwa Rambert: By day I work as a graphic designer for a small woman-owned firm. I enjoy working on a small team because I get to work on a variety of projects like branding, web design, and editorial layouts. Last August I launched Heart & Soul PVD, my online shop where I hand-embroider patches and design enamel pins.

 

 Hand-embroidered patch by Danikqwa Rambert for her shop, Heart and Soul PVD

Hand-embroidered patch by Danikqwa Rambert for her shop, Heart and Soul PVD

How do you define success for yourself?

DR: In business, I want to be financially stable, but that is not the end all be all of my efforts. As an artist I want my work to resonate with others and make them think. At the end of the day I rest easier knowing that I gave my best effort in all of the work I’ve done.
 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are?

DR: I am an outgoing homebody for sure. I am not an introvert but I am very much a creature of comfort. I like to create work in solitude but at the same time I thrive off making genuine connections and meeting new people.

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?
DR:

  1. Gardens/Greenery. Growing up I would watch my grandmother paint flowers from her garden. Peonies are one of her favorites, and they are also one of my favorite flowers to draw.

  2. The ocean. There’s just something about the smell of sea salt and the sound of waves crashing on the shore that make me feel at home.

  3. Handcrafted details. My grandmother, clearly a big influence in my life, has an “I can do that” attitude about almost anything that she can do with her hands. She has a love of cooking, sewing, building, gardening—you name it. Her appreciation for using her hands has given me a deep respect for objects of craft created out of hard work, attention to detail, and passion.

 Enamel Pin by Danikqwa Rambert for her shop,  Heart and Soul PVD

Enamel Pin by Danikqwa Rambert for her shop, Heart and Soul PVD

How do you keep joy in what you do?

DR: I keep joy in knowing that every effort, no matter how small, is a step towards improving my craft. While I do like experimenting and trying new things, sometimes I get bogged down when I’m in that “beginner” phase. I’m learning to get comfortable being a beginner.

What is some of the best advice you received?

DR: My grandmother, who is also an artist and designer, always told me that there is no such thing as bad work, just opportunities to practice. This advice carries me through moments where I’m dissatisfied with the outcome of my work. She also told me to always use the best materials possible, because you never know when you just might happen to create great work. I think these two pieces of advice sum up the highs and lows of the creative process.

Laura: I am amazed at the patience Danikqwa has for attention to detail. Her grandmother's advice of using the best materials possible also makes me think! I've definitely felt pressure in the past when I'm using more expensive media, but I like this idea her grandmother has. It feels like a good way to respect and expect inspiration. So cool! Thanks to Danikqwa for sharing her process and thoughts. Check her work out more at the links below!

Danikqwa Rambert's Websites/ Social Media:

Danikqwa's Website 

Danikqwa on Instagram and Twitter

Shop her Embroidery and Enamel pins

Heart & Soul PVD on Instagram (her Shop)


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews! 

"Moving the Viewer's Spirit:" Interview with Devon Rodriguez, Painter and Portrait Artist


Interview-devon-rodriguez.jpg

Today, I'm excited to share Devon Rodriguez, painter and portrait artist! Through mutual friends I have loved following his progression in capturing likeness and his unique viewpoint as a native New Yorker. His paintings remind me of my days in New York of eternal subway rides - sometimes meditative, sometimes mysterious, always very human. Can you believe he's only 21 and can paint like this? Enjoy!

Devon Rodriguez, Painter & Portrait Artist

What you do or make?

Devon Rodriguez: I document contemporary urban people with oil paint. 

  "Brooklyn"  by  Devon Rodriguez , oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches 

"Brooklyn" by Devon Rodriguez, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches 

How do you define success for yourself?

DR: 6 years ago, success to me would’ve been to have the ability to paint a “realistic” portrait with a decent likeness. Now I’d say that success is to create a work that is profound and moves the viewer's spirit. 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are?

DR: In one way, I want to create for just pure passion and joy. In another way, I want as many eyes as possible on my work. I think it’s a complex that many artists deal with.  

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?

DR:

  1. Observing graffiti.
  2. Street fashion.
  3. Watching my grandfather paint.
  "Parkslopians"  by  Devon Rodriguez , oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches 

"Parkslopians" by Devon Rodriguez, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 inches 

How do you keep joy in what you do?

DR: At this point, just thinking about the fresh color on my palette brings me joy. I mean, sometimes it’s hard work, but that natural spark always comes back to me, always. 

What is some of the best advice you received?

DR: From my mentor John Ahearn, he said to me once “You must create works that are undeniably you.” 

Devon's commitment to the discipline of his art form gives me motivation to push through the creative blocks in my own work. Take a look at more of his work!

Devon Rodriguez's Websites/ Social Media:

Devon on Instagram

Devon Rodriguez's Portfolio


Dimensional Creatives is a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me.

 Laura Dreyer

Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted and unique! Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, which makes the world magical. Read more Dimensional Creatives Interviews here >

Follow me on instagram to know when I publish new interviews! 

"Remember Your Why:" Interview with Feyth Scott, Arts Advocate and Marketing Professional.


 Interview with Feyth Scott, Arts Advocate and Marketing Professional. Dimensional Creatives Interview Series by Laura Dreyer.

I love hearing stories of how people have given creativity space in their lives, and where it has taken them. In thinking about what I wanted to do with this blog, I decided to start a series of interviews with a selection of the creatives I know who bring me perspective, inspire, and motivate me! I'm calling it: (drumroll please):

"Dimensional Creatives: Interview Series"

I love the idea that people are dimensional. Every person has aspects of their work, personality, or interests that seem contradictory, but the way these traits coexist in the same human makes them multi-faceted. Sharing these lets us all be a little more ourselves, and that is magical. Enjoy this interview with Feyth Scott, a lovely human, arts advocate, and marketing professional, who is making space for that magic!

Feyth Scott, Arts Advocate and Marketing Professional

What you do or make?

FS: I do marketing in the nonprofit sector. It’s my happy place. My dream job as a child was to work at St. Jude’s, and I studied Marketing in college to work with and eventually own a nonprofit. I currently work as the Strategic Partnerships & Collaborations Coordinator of The Dinner Table Documentary (NYC), Marketing Chair of the historic Anne Spencer Museum, and help with graphics at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Virginia, amongst others. I also am a huge arts advocate, self-taught freelance graphic designer, dabble in social media marketing for some organizations, write poetry, and coordinate events. 

I coordinated an event for The Dinner Table called Black Girls Create last March, discussing the importance of sisterhood and using your creativity to impact your community and art showcase of local artists and entrepreneurs. It inspired our new mentoring program, Beyond the Table, which we are rolling out this year. I also develop and coordinate community events as the Events Manager for Black in the Burg. We co-hosted a screening with The Listening, Inc. on March 10th, and sent about 60 underserved kids to see Black Panther, and captured their responses on the film. It empowered me to keep going what I’m doing.  

 Black Girls Create - Coordinated by Feyth Scott for  The Dinner Table Documentary .

Black Girls Create - Coordinated by Feyth Scott for The Dinner Table Documentary.

How do you define success for yourself?

FS: Walking in your purpose. Making an impact (big or small) and inspiring others to share their story to inspire someone else. It’s a domino effect. 

 

What are two ways you characterize yourself that might seem contradictory? How do these make you who you are?

FS: Introverted and yet, very opinionated. I think and analyze things deeply but may not express it 80% of the time. I think I put those thoughts into my work instead of just talking about it. 

What are three influences from your childhood on what you find beautiful today?

FS:

  1. Black women: 
    I was always surrounded by strong black women role models as a child, specifically my mom, sisters, aunties and cousins, 
    - Raven Symone - she was doing everything (singing, acting, entrepreneur) and looked like me. 
    - Whitney Houston & Aaliyah - some favorites as a child (way beyond their times)
  2. 90s era - natural beauty was such a huge thing and the culture was very different than now. 
  3. Spoken word- always has been my favorite form of inspiration, hearing people’s stories, creativity of delivery, and vulnerability to say what is on their heart. That’s beautiful to me. 

 

How do you keep joy in what you do?

FS: Remember my why/purpose - inspire others and creating spaces for people to flourish and finding ways to be creative. Whenever I’m stressed or unmotivated, I pray and find creative outlets to reset. 

 

What is some of the best advice you received?

FS: Remember your why. Your goals might change, but your purpose doesn’t and share your story, you don’t know who is waiting to hear it. 

 

I hope you enjoyed this interview with Feyth! Her vision for making space for people to create inspires me and you can follow her journey here:

 

Feyth Scott's Websites/ Social Media:

Feyth on Instagram

Feyth Scott Portfolio

Dinner Table Documentary

 

- Laura

Surprising Yourself: Hand-drawing Decorative Frames

There's something about being surprised that draws me to making things. 

Remember your first time, as a child, feeling the magic of cutting tiny pieces out of a folded white paper square and unfolding it to discover the surprising design of your beautiful little paper snowflake?

About four years ago, I found myself drawing frames made of flowers and rococo-inspired forms, but I rarely wanted to close the shapes.

Something about only drawing half a frame allowed space for my imagination to play along with my hands - to jump ahead of my fingers and predict what it would look like reflected symmetrically.

 Drawing symmetrical decorative frames by Laura Dreyer.

Making space for that element of surprise gave me such delight when I did reflect my drawings to create what I couldn't fully predict! Like pulling your new "experimental" recipe cookies from the oven, there were frames that didn't seem right - something was poking out too far or just "tasted weird," but there were also new notes and flavors that I loved!

I believe allowing yourself to be delighted - or even disappointed - by what comes out of your hands when you sit down to make something is valuable, because it represents opening to something outside yourself.

It represents risking disappointment for the opportunity of delight, and trusting that the future, though hidden, can be your friend in ways you won't see until it arrives.

And that is how I want to live my life!

See more of my frames here.